Commissioning a Painting and Price Guide

I am so glad you are interested in commissioning a pet portrait! The portraits I paint are done from your photos--you know your pet better than anyone. Send me as many as you can as it is helpful when choosing the best photo for the portrait, however, I work from the one photo chosen. Tell me if you have a favorite photo and I will let you know if I can use it as a reference. If you email them to me try to send them at the highest resolution possible. You can also mail them to me as prints or on a CD. I will return the prints along with the finished portrait.
A non-refundable deposit of 50% is due when I accept the commission and before starting the painting. The time it takes to complete a portrait depends on my commissions at the time. Sometimes as little as three weeks and other times there may be a three month waiting list. If you need the painting for a special occasion I will work with you if possible.  For Christmas gifts please plan well in advance.
I will send you updates on the developing portrait.
When I have completed the portrait I will send you a digital copy by email.  If no changes are necessary the balance of the commission is due and I will ship the painting using professional packing and shipping charges which will be an additional cost.
The following is a price guide. Please feel free to contact me if you have questions or are interested in different sizes. I have painted some very large paintings of pets that now reside in homes with vaulted ceilings.
I would love to create a lasting memory of your cherished animal friend.
Hollis

 




Price Guide

Watercolor

12x12                  $165.00

16x16                  $220.00

22x22                  $275.00

Oil on Canvas

16x16                  $300.00

24x24                  $400.00

36x36                  $600.00

The watercolors are unframed

The oil on canvas are gallery wrapped (the  edges are painted).


Gift Certificates are available.
I retain copyright on my artwork.
Photography tips (more on the blog)

1. Try to get in close to your pet, filling the frame with the pet rather than scenery. Take extra close-ups of the face.

2. Take the photographs at your pet’s level. It may be helpful to have someone talk to your pet while you take the photos.

3. Outdoor lighting is best but flash is fine too. Take the best photos you can because the quality of the finished painting depends on good photos.

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